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ASCAP Distributes More Than $1.8 Million In ASCAP Plus Cash Awards

The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) is pleased to announce that more than $1.8 million in cash awards for 2012-2013 was distributed to songwriter and composer members by the Society’s ASCAP Plus Awards Panels. The purpose of these special awards, which have been given each year since 1960, is to reward writers whose works have a unique prestige value for which adequate compensation would not otherwise be received, and to compensate those writers whose works are performed substantially in media not surveyed by ASCAP. Close to 3,100 songwriter and composer members of ASCAP received Plus Awards in their January 2013 distribution.

“For more than 50 years, the ASCAP Plus Awards has consistently provided deserving music creators with something meaningful and tangible in the form of recognition and money. Our goal is that these awards not only serve as an additional revenue stream, but also as an inspiration to those just starting out to persevere in advancing their music careers,” said ASCAP President and Chairman Paul Williams. “We are greatly indebted to each of our hard-working panelists for giving their time and effort to this important endeavor.”

Composer and clarinetist Derek Bermel, a recipient of multiple ASCAP Plus Awards commented: “It’s a tremendous honor to be recognized with an ASCAP Plus Award, and it helps pay the rent! The importance of this essential program can’t be overstated.”

Folk singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier added: “I am deeply grateful for the ASCAP Plus Awards I’ve received over the years. The money appears in January, right when I am wondering how I’m going to pay my credit card bills after the music business Christmas lull, and it has saved the day over and over again. For a road dog like me, who travels constantly juggling tour dates, writing, recording and self management, the annual Award helps keep the show on the road.”

The members of the ASCAP Plus Awards Panel are: Leotis Clyburn, Former EMI Publishing Executive and Music Industry Consultant; Andrew Cyr, Grammy Award-nominated conductor of the Metropolis Ensemble; Peter Filichia, New York-based theater critic for the (Newark) Star-Ledger and New Jersey’s News 12 television station; Fernanda Garcia, Public Relations Director/Promotions for El Especial; Joel Goodman, renowned Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award-winning composer; David Hajdu, professional music critic for The New Republic and professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism; Janeiro Matos, Bachata, salsa, merengue and Reggaeton DJ for Mega 97.9 FM in New York; Emily Mueller, production assistant for Grammy Award-winning producer Nathan Chapman and A&R assistant on projects for Laura Bell Bundy and The McClymonts; Chris Oglesby, seasoned publishing vet and founder of Oglesby Writer Management; Cheryl Pawelski, Grammy Award-nominated Vice President of A&R for Rhino Records and owner of Omnivore Recordings; Ryan Shore, Grammy Award-nominated composer for film, television, records and games; Steve Smith, Opera and Classical Music Editor for Time Out New York; Adonis Sutherlin, Associate Director of A&R for RCA Records; Tera Uhlinger, producer, composer and owner of Revelry Management.

ASCAP songwriters and composers that received less than $25,000 in domestic performance royalties in the previous calendar year are eligible to apply now, and can do so with the online application via Member Access (http://members.ascap.com). The deadline for submissions is July 1st, 2013.

Recipients of ASCAP Plus Awards are determined by reviewing the recent activity generated by each applicant’s catalog in the context of all other applicants’ activity. There are three divisions of the program, which include Pop (cabaret, children’s, country, electronica, folk, Hawaiian, hip-hop/rap, jazz, Latin, musical theatre, pop, R&B/soul, religious and rock); Film/TV Score (written specifically for the audio/visual spectrum); and Concert/Classical Music (symphonic, chamber, instrumental, choral, vocal, electroacoustic, opera, liturgical and educational).

 

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COMMON MUSIC LICENSING TERMS

For those of us who need to be reminded of certain terms and for those of you who have never known but would like to know what certain terms are I thought it would be a great idea to post or re post this definitions of terms from ASCAP.com I am a member of this orginazation and I am very happy to be. So let’s dig in shall we…oh yes if you have any questions, thoughts or comments please feel free to share them with everyone they might be thinking the same thing.

ADI
ADI or Area of Dominant Influence is the geographic area or market reached by a radio or television station. It is used by advertisers and rating companies to determine the potential audience of a station.

Blanket License
“Blanket license” is a license which allows the music user to perform any or all of over 8.5 million songs in the ASCAP repertory as much or as little as they like. Licensees pay an annual fee for the license. The blanket license saves music users the paperwork, trouble and expense of finding and negotiating licenses with all of the copyright owners of the works that might be used during a year and helps prevent the user from even inadvertently infringing on the copyrights of ASCAP’s members and the many foreign writers whose music is licensed by ASCAP in the U.S. [see also Per Program License]

Dramatic or Grand Rights or Dramatic Performances

ASCAP members do not grant ASCAP the right to license dramatic performances of their works. While the line between dramatic and non dramatic is not clear and depends on the facts, a dramatic performance usually involves using the work to tell a story or as part of a story or plot. Dramatic performances, among others, include:

(i) performance of an entire “dramatico-musical work.” For example a performance of the musical play Oklahoma would be a dramatic performance.

(ii) performance of one or more musical compositions from a “dramatico-musical work” accompanied by dialogue, pantomime, dance, stage action, or visual representation of the work from which the music is taken. For example a performance of “People Will Say We’re In Love” from Oklahoma with costumes, sets or props or dialogue from the show would be dramatic.

(iii) performance of one or more musical compositions as part of a story or plot, whether accompanied or unaccompanied by dialogue, pantomime, dance, stage action or visual representation. For example, incorporating a performance of “If I Loved You” into a story or plot would be a dramatic performance of the song.

(iv) performance of a concert version of a “dramatico-musical work.” For example, a performance of all the songs in Oklahoma even without costumes or sets would be a dramatic performances.

The term “dramatico-musical work” includes, but is not limited to, a musical comedy, opera, play with music, revue or ballet.

ASCAP has the right to license “non-dramatic” public performances of its members’ works – for example, recordings broadcast on radio, songs or background music performed as part of a movie or other television program, or live or recorded performances in a bar or restaurant.

Dramatic and grand rights are licensed by the composer or the publisher of the work.

Mechanical Rights
A mechanical right is the right to record and distribute (without visual images) a song on a phonorecord for private use. Mechanical rights or a mechanical license must be obtained in order to lawfully make and distribute records, CD’s and tapes. Recording rights for most music publishers can be obtained from

The Harry Fox Agency
205 East 42nd Street
New York, New York 10017
212-370-5330
http://www.nmpa.org/hfa.html

Music Publisher
A music publisher works with songwriters to market and promote songs, resulting in exposure of songs to the public and generating income. Music publishers “pitch” songs to record labels, movie and television producers and others who use music, then license the right to use the song and collect fees for the usage. Those fees are then split with the songwriter.

For more info visit www.markallanwolfe.com

Per Program License
A “per program” license is similar to the blanket license in that it authorizes a radio or television broadcaster to use all the works in the ASCAP repertory. However, the license is designed to cover use of ASCAP music in a specific radio or television programs, requiring that the user keep track of all music used. Also, the user must be certain to obtain rights for all the music used in programs not covered by the license.

Public Performance or Performance Rights

A public performance is one that occurs “in a place open to the public or at any place where a substantial number of persons outside of a normal circle of a family and its social acquaintances is gathered.” A public performance also occurs when the performance is transmitted by means of any device or process (for example, via broadcast, telephone wire, or other means) to the public. In order to perform a copyrighted work publicly, the user must obtain performance rights from the copyright owner or his representative.

Record Label
A record label (or record company) makes, distributes and markets sound recordings (CD’s, tapes, etc.) Record labels obtain from music publishers the right to record and distribute songs and in turn pay license fees for the recordings.

Retransmission
A transmission of a performance is one that is sent by any device or process (for example, radio, TV, cable, satellite, telephone) and received in a different place. A retransmission is a further transmission of that performance to yet another place.

Sound Recording
A sound recording refers to the copyright in a recording as distinguished from the copyright in a song. The copyright in the song encompasses the words and music and is owned by the songwriter or music publisher. The sound recording is the result of recording music, words or other sounds onto a tape, record, CD, etc. The copyright encompasses what you hear: the artist singing, the musicians playing, the entire production). The sound recording copyright is owned by the record label. The copyright in the musical work itself is owned by the music publisher, which grants the record label a “mechanical” license to record and distribute the song as part of the record.

Synchronization or “Synch” Rights
A synchronization or “synch” right involves the use of a recording of musical work in audio-visual form: for example as part of a motion picture, television program, commercial announcement, music video or other videotape. Often, the music is “synchronized” or recorded in timed relation with the visual images. Synchronization rights are licensed by the music publisher to the producer of the movie or program.

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